23 09 2009




Welcome to the journal of my work.  I’m looking forward to chronicling both the old and the new. Ideas, inspirations, mistakes, and progress will all be celebrated.



One simple quilt

27 11 2015

But first—

Last week I forgot to include a picture of the back of the Indigo Study quilt (#250) in the post.  Although nothing like the Japanese style of the front of the quilt, the colors of this piece were so perfect and the fabric was so wonderful that I thought it would be fun as a back.

Indigo Study, Back

                                          Indigo Study, Back

And now a super simple quilt, just the thing for someone getting started, since four patches combined with whole square blocks are an easy pattern to sew in this straight grid.

This is also the perfect quilt to use up all those 2.5″ squares I keep cutting from leftover scraps of finished quilts.

In this case, however, the Leftover quilt was finished before the original one, perhaps because it was so much smaller and that much easier to quilt and bind.

Turquoise Four Patches, 2015 44.5" x 44.5"

                                 Turquoise Four Patches, 2015
                                                    44.5″ x 44.5″

Here are two detail photos showing the quilting pattern in the body of the quilt and in the borders.  This is an easy pattern for me to quilt using the walking foot and not marking before I start the curves, mainly because I have done soooo many quilts like this.  I like how it looks complicated but is quite simple, sewing each row of the curves twice, from top to bottom and side to side.

Turquoise Four Patches, 2015 44.5" x 44.5"

                               Turquoise Four Patches Detail 1


Turquoise Four Patches, Detail 2

                                      Turquoise Four Patches, Detail 2

This quilt will also be available for purchase at the Voices in Cloth 2016 quilt show this coming March.

A new quilt–#250!!

20 11 2015

Ever since I started keeping a list of my finished quilts  (including  recreating the items finished before I started the list), I have been pleasingly amazed at the count.  I thought 200 was pretty good, and here is Number 250!  And still going.

Indigo Study was made from a huge pile of yukata strips that came to me from another quilt guild member.  I did not intend to spend time with these, but then my daughter sent me a link to a YouTube video that demonstrated the Jelly Roll Race quilt top technique, so I thought I would try it.  See the Jelly Roll demo here.

Indigo Study, 2015 32.5" x 43"

Indigo Study, 2015         32.5″ x 43″

I worked until I ran out of pre-cut strips, so this is how big it got.  Turned out as this random mess of boldly designed fabrics all mashed together–just my type of quilt.

I  thought these fabrics looked better with the strips running vertically, rather than the horizontal presentation in the video.

The technique was simple, fun, and perfect for those times when you just want to sit down and sew, without too much planning.  Instant quilt.

Here is a detail of the quilting, a hanging diamonds pattern.  These quilts are so scrappy that ornate quilting might not be seen, so I stayed simple.

Also, perhaps more importantly—there is something rewarding about “finished”.

Indigo Study, Detail, 2015

Indigo Study, Detail, 2015

This quilt and a few of my others, both small and large, will be available for sale in the Marketplace at the upcoming East Bay Heritage Quilters Voices in Cloth 2016 show in March of next year.  All the proceeds from these sales will be donated to the Deanna Davis Community Quilts Project.

Click here to find out more information about this Show.

Two new works-in-progress

9 10 2015

I have a pile of quilts that I have almost finished quilting, just a few more finishing touches.  Since I can’t showcase them here yet, I will show the two projects that are just getting started, always a fun part of the process.

The first is another of the Pyramid block quilts that I really love, having made a lot of them using many different sized triangles.


I don’t know where this one will end up design-wise, but I know this is how I wanted this part to be—-a big jumble of all these yukata fabrics smashed together.  Half triangles will finish off the ends of the  rows so that this center will be a straight rectangle.  What comes next is TBD.


And the second WIP (which will be immediately followed by another similar one) is the beginning of the lettering on a Christmas stocking for one of the two new kitties in my extended family.

“J” and padding for “a” are completed.


These are so fun to make.  Stay tuned to see the finished products; I think they will be special.



Time for some cuteness

28 08 2015

I just finished working on the quilting of a small piece for the Children”s Quilt Project of our guild.  Someone donated these super cute pets and their friends panels to the Project, and I could not resist sewing them into a top.  I think that I am drawn to this imagery because these pets remind me of the children’s books I checked out of the Ida Public Library when I was much, much younger.


I’m continuing my venturing into the arena of free-motion quilting, and these smaller pieces are perfect for practicing.  I decided to put just a little  quilting into these blocks, and I like the way it turned out.  Hope it makes someone else happy, too.

Kitten Block


Eat Your Vegetables III

21 08 2015

Back in late 2013 I was working with the leftovers from a pack of half yard pieces of this whole line of vegetable fabrics.  I had finished two small quilts using these fabrics and was working on a third, having trouble finding borders, etc.

Here is the finished quilt, and I love how it turned out, mainly because of something that is not easily visible.

 Eat Your Vegetables III , 2015 36.5

Here is a detail of the quilting . . .

Eat Your Vegetables III--Detail

and this is the surprise that I think makes this quilt fun:

Eat Your Vegetables III Backing

Eat Your Vegetables III

The backing is older Joe Boxer fabric chock full of junk food. The colors almost match perfectly, although the image contents are conflicting.  Fun for me.

Happy Quilt II-much more fun

14 08 2015

Surprise, surprise. . . . I just can’t stop playing with these bright, bold, geometric fabrics that I first began to put together when taking the Freddy Moran Parts Department class  (see previous post about the Happy Quilt).


So I made Happy Quilt II, because I still had more of these strata leftover (hooorrraaaaaay for leftovers!!).  And the yellow background fabric in this quilt in between the rows of strips reminds me of another quilt of mine, Yellow Rows of Seven.

When I started quilting a thousand years ago, people did not favor yellow and orange, thinking they were too bold and difficult to work in with other colors.  So it feels as though I have come full circle now, loving yellow and orange equally with all the other colors.

Happy Quilt II, 2015 60" x 74" Photography by Sibila Savage

Happy Quilt II, 2015
60″ x 74″
Photography by Sibila Savage

And I had fun doing a very simple quilting pattern on this quilt.  Seems as though “simple” is my only style these days.

Happy Quilt II, detail

Happy Quilt II, detail

And stay tuned.  I am pretty sure that I am not finished with this “Happy” phase.  Guess it’s a series.

Here’s an option for another, although I’m not completely satisfied with it yet.  Must by why it’s not finished yet.

Happy work in progress

Happy work in progress

Two vintage quilt tops–eye-popping color

7 08 2015

Here are two of my vintage quilt tops that I love a lot.  These are perhaps the oldest in my collection.

Beware–if you stare at these too long, your eyeballs might start to wiggle.

I decided to photograph them as tops and not quilts, since I don’t know when I will have a chance to get them quilted, and also because I might sell them and want to remember these two beauties.

artwork by Susan Dague

When looking at the detail photograph, I can see the really wonderful fabrics used in the half-square triangles of the main blocks without the distraction of the yellow and the cheddar overwhelming them.

artwork by Susan Dague


The second quilt top is a postage stamp pattern with really fabulous fabrics playing with each other.  Included in these small blocks are many lovely plaids and stripes.

artwork by Susan DagueThe plaids and stripes coordinate so well with each other..


I’m beginning to understand why I really like the Civil War reproduction fabrics, since they have much the same character as these authentic vintage fabrics.




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