Fabric postcards: still going strong

27 02 2015

I have not posted anything recently about fabric postcards, even though I have made more than 250 of them since the Voices in Cloth 2014 Show last spring.  I found I could not stop making them.  It was way too much fun.

Here are a few of the couple dozen I made for Halloween.

HalloweenCards

I made approximately  35 for the Christmas season, and they were gobbled up by some guild members.  Soooooo, I made a few zillions more, but I made them in January, when I had plenty of time.  Here are a few of them.

SantaCards3

More Santas . . . .

XmasCards1

Vintage Christmas card images . . . .

XmasCards2

A few more Santas . . . .

SantaCards2

and more . . . .

SantaCards

And then I switched to  BACON, thanks to the leftover scraps from making a shirt for my brother.  Fab fabric!

BaconCards

And just a few more;  I think I want to make a lot of the “Thank You” cards.  What an easy way to send gratitude through the mail.

ThankYouPostcards

Advertisements




Work-in-progress; more leftover tales

20 02 2015

Do you have days when you want to sit at your machine and just sew and sew and sew?

At a recent retreat, I made tons of new “parts” for a fun and happy quilt, and these long strings of strata or piano keys leftover from my previous Freddy-Moran-ish venture looked as though they would not work in the new quilt, since they did not seems to play together well with the new creations.

I decided that I did not want to work right now on quilts that take a lot of brain power.  I have done enough of that recently, and I am meeting personal challenges right now, so my work does not need to be challenging, too.  It needs to be safe, fun, and easy right now.

Sooooo, rather than trying to find a way to make them fit, I decided to let them play all by themselves.  Here is where I am so far in this fun new project.  I’m fascinated at how much this modern version reminds me of my Yellow Rows of Seven, which is all vintage fabrics.

Have I started a series?

IMG_0120

The only problem (so far):  there are now leftover leftovers, the strata that don’t fit into this new quilt, which would be huge if they did.  Wow, I guess I really did make too many of these.  Just couldn’t stop, since they were soooooo fun to sew.  These are the remaining strips . . . .

IMG_0119

. . . and these are the remaining waiting-to-be-strata pieces.

IMG_0121Beginning to think this quilt may have some sort of a strata border??

To be continued . . .





Vintage Drunkard’s Path, a variation

13 02 2015

I fell in love with this quilt top when I found it in 1994 in an antique collective in Rockford, Illinois.  According to Barbara Brackman, this block is a Rob Peter to Pay Paul variation of the familiar Drunkard’s Path block.

#8C_RobPeterToPayPaul

All the very bright colors make this a very happy quilt, and it is one that we use.

RobPeterDetail1

I replaced five heavily stained blocks with ones made from vintage fabric in my stash.  Two of the blocks I replaced are pictured here, second and third down.

RobPeterDetail2

This 1994 quilt also represents the beginning of my long and still-continuing process of learning machine quilting.  I see here that all I was able to do at the time was outline each of these blocks in the ditch.  Gotta start somewhere.