More kitties

19 03 2011

Seeing that Wally was featured in the last post, Bozo and Lucy are requesting equal time.  And since their photos are so wonderful, I feel compelled to include them in the tales on this post.  Please indulge;  they do so love their stockings.

Bozo opening the stocking

Lucy with stocking

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Hope they all enjoyed their holiday in the Florida sun!!!!!

Bozo under the tree

All three lucky lounging kitties

Advertisements




Christmas for More Kitties

15 03 2011

Having seen the Christmas stockings I made last year for Raja and Mrs Potts (posted previously in “A bit of Christmas”), Bozo, Lucy and Wally were heard to mew, “What about stockings for us!?!?”  I didn’t actually hear the mew, but it was passed on to me by my brother Dave.

Bozo stocking

Lucy stocking

There is only one challenge in coming up with numerous cat gear: finding cat-related fabric that is tolerable, with the additional condition that it needs also to have a Christmas theme.  E-bay was the mother lode, as well as the generosity of fellow quilters.

Wally stocking

These stocking turned out to be soooo much fun to make, since I could do anything I wanted.  And I didn’t stop at the ones for the cats.  I continued on with tropical themes for Dave and Wendy, too.

Wendy stocking

Dave stocking

Try doing something so fun and whimsical.  It’s a blast!!

Comment about the lettering—-Since I have been asked numerous times, I confess I do not have a special attachment to my machine to make the lettering for the names.  It is done the old fashioned way–by hand.  Find wonderful free fonts online, print out a name, and transfer to the right side of the fabric using a light box.  One must be dedicated when cats are involved.

Wally and Christmas goodies





Pyramid leftovers

10 03 2011

. . . . . the last for now . . . .

Japanese Pyramids IV, 2010

When collecting fabric for Japanese Pyramids I (see post “Recent Photo Session-Part 2”), I occasionally had to purchase a bundle of samples to get the colors I needed for the quilt.  So  when I finished both quilts I and II, I had a pile of bright samples leftover, the ones that did not fit into the palettes of either quilt.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Japanese Pyramids V, 2010

I tried several times to give away these pieces to friends, but there were no takers.  Then, during a fabric stash purge, I decided not to part with the fabrics, and realized that although they did not coordinate with the colors of the original palettes, they might coordinate with each other.  On a wonderful sewing retreat in Tahoe with a friend, the new bright triangles made these two small quilts.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

To differentiate them from each other I added a new (for me) quilting pattern to one of the pair.

Detail-Japanese Pyramids V, 2010

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………It  continues to be hard for me to throw away the leftovers from any of my previous projects.  I know I walk the fine line between collecting and hoarding, but . .

Photography by Sibila Savage




Japanese Pyramids III, a more recent work

8 03 2011

Japanese Pyramids III, 2010

There are just a few more, mostly very recent.  I thought that I was finished with this pattern for a while, and then it made a resurgence, in the form of this work and two others.

Exhibited in EBHQ’s Voices in Cloth 2010 Show, this quilt was made from a stack of fabric samples, no two the same.  This batch of fabric offered me an immediate challenge, the kind of puzzle I love to solve:  Will I be able to get all these fabrics in the same quilt in a pleasing way ???

I adjusted the size of the triangle to maximize the number of blocks I could cut from each piece of fabric, thus determining the size of the quilt.  At times, working on this quilt was a strain on the eyes.  I blinked often, so as to continue to keep my eyes in focus.  The quilt finally worked best when I added the three solids.  They seemed to stop the eyes from spinning around the quilt forever.  The final touch to hold it all together was the addition of the outer borders, very dark indigo, capable of stabilizing the piece.

Detail-Japanese Pyramids III, 2010

I am often asked how I choose the quilting style for my works that have sooooo much pattern going on in them.  Truthfully, it almost doesn’t matter how they are quilted.  I am a fan of efficiency, and I’d rather not spend time and effort on quilting that cannot be seen.  Look carefully at this detail (and even click to enlarge) and see how difficult it is even to find the quilting.

Your space-out activity of the day: Click on the large photo, stare at it, and see if you think it vibrates.  Our eyes are amazing.

Photography by Sibila Savage





Alex’s 100 Pyramids-The beginning of a series

6 03 2011

100 Pyramids, 2004

Adding a bit more background detail to previous description , and giving Alex her place in this ancient history. . .

When I knew that I had the 2007 graduation day as a deadline to finish six quilts, I decided to keep the quilts as simple as possible, and yet show off beautiful fabric. something that was always important to the young girls as they sewed.  Personally and artistically it was quite daunting and yet liberating to have challenged myself to produce, and the liberating part was the voice inside that said, “Drop all your preconceived notions about everything having to be so special, and start sewing quilts now!”
I came up with great ideas for quilts, and, unfortunately, I loved a few of the creations so much that I could not yet give them away, thus adding more to the work load. This period turned out to be one of my most productive, for which I am most grateful.
Making the whole top for this quilt in one weekend retreat at Asilomar in July, 2004, I quickly learned that the quilt went together quite easily when I figured out a few tricks, and I also learned that I absolutely loved the triangles.  I briefly considered making a triangle quilt for each of the girls using different fabric families, but dismissed that idea as boring.  I wanted each girl to have something special.

I named this quilt 100 Pyramids, as an homage to the traditional quilt pattern 1000 Pyramids, a quilt made from (perhaps) thousands of much smaller equilateral triangles, a quilt I knew I would never make.

Marking and quilting these triangles in flowing curves was the final complement to the overall pattern.

This one quilt was just the beginning in a long series of Pyramid quilts I have made over the years, both for myself, for sale, as gifts, and as samples for the classes I once taught.  Other quilts are documented in prior entries to this blog, and more are coming soon.

photography by Sibila Savage





Christmas “Dot to Dot”

5 03 2011

It’s not all ancient history

Christmas Medley II, 2010

The block I used for Maggie’s quilt was so much fun that I used it again when I wanted to make a new Christmas quilt for 2010.  I had gifted two Christmas quilts the previous year, so it was time to make two new ones.

I pulled out the wonderful stash of Christmas fabrics (and, no, I don’t know why these fabrics are so attractive to me, just like the Halloween fabrics;  I remain clueless and addicted) and started making the blocks.  Again, they almost made themselves.  Lots of fun.

The unforeseen bonus was seeing all the blocks up on the design wall next to each other, now looking like rows and rows of Christmas gifts.  Score!!!

Great borders were the finishing touch.  Both the Christmas quilts from 2010 have blue borders, and I think this is a very pleasing look.  Looked great up on the wall during the holidays.

Quilting detail:

Detail, Christmas Medley II

Photography by Sibila Savage

Make this quilt;  you will have soooooo much fun.





Maggie’s Graduation Quilt-June 2007

4 03 2011

Dot to Dot, 2006

. . . . as promised a fair bit ago . . . .

The History of Maggie’s Graduation Quilt

When my daughter Maggie and her friend Danielle were sewing together as pre-teens, they decided that someday they would make a quilt entirely out of dotty fabrics in bright colors. This was the origin of the idea for Maggie’s graduation quilt, because  I wanted to surprise her, but she hates surprises.  So I asked permission to make the dots quilt she and Dannie had never gotten around to.  With a general permission granted, I could now surprise Maggie with the actual quilt, and still know that my project was a safe “surprise” for her.

This quilt was so much fun to make;  the more blocks I made the more blocks I wanted to make.  With such a simple block design, the colors of the wonderful dots began to take over.  Holding all these patterns together into the same quilt took a very strong border, and the royal blue used in the border is the only piece of fabric I bought in Paris on a family trip in 2004.

Dot to Dot, quilting detail

And eight more quilt stories to go.