Two vintage quilt tops–eye-popping color

7 08 2015

Here are two of my vintage quilt tops that I love a lot.  These are perhaps the oldest in my collection.

Beware–if you stare at these too long, your eyeballs might start to wiggle.

I decided to photograph them as tops and not quilts, since I don’t know when I will have a chance to get them quilted, and also because I might sell them and want to remember these two beauties.

artwork by Susan Dague

When looking at the detail photograph, I can see the really wonderful fabrics used in the half-square triangles of the main blocks without the distraction of the yellow and the cheddar overwhelming them.

artwork by Susan Dague

 

The second quilt top is a postage stamp pattern with really fabulous fabrics playing with each other.  Included in these small blocks are many lovely plaids and stripes.

artwork by Susan DagueThe plaids and stripes coordinate so well with each other..

VintPostageStampTop_6-2015-med_2

I’m beginning to understand why I really like the Civil War reproduction fabrics, since they have much the same character as these authentic vintage fabrics.

Enjoy.

 





Vintage Drunkard’s Path, a variation

13 02 2015

I fell in love with this quilt top when I found it in 1994 in an antique collective in Rockford, Illinois.  According to Barbara Brackman, this block is a Rob Peter to Pay Paul variation of the familiar Drunkard’s Path block.

#8C_RobPeterToPayPaul

All the very bright colors make this a very happy quilt, and it is one that we use.

RobPeterDetail1

I replaced five heavily stained blocks with ones made from vintage fabric in my stash.  Two of the blocks I replaced are pictured here, second and third down.

RobPeterDetail2

This 1994 quilt also represents the beginning of my long and still-continuing process of learning machine quilting.  I see here that all I was able to do at the time was outline each of these blocks in the ditch.  Gotta start somewhere.





Vintage Double Wedding Ring

11 07 2014

Another quilt from my vintage collection, this large Double Wedding Ring quilt shows a wonderful array of vintage fabrics, held together by the jade green and pale orange dancing four patches.  This is another of the quilt tops I  purchased, and it was a bit wonky, which may have been the reason for its never having been quilted before now.

Vintage Double Wedding Ring 80" x 90" Photography by Sibila Savage

Vintage Double Wedding Ring
80″ x 90″
Photography by Sibila Savage

Melissa Quilter took on the challenge of making it all work, and her quilting detail does this one proud.  Click on the photo to see a closer view.

It has been a long time since I have bothered to fuss with a curved binding like this, but I think it really makes a statement.  I was pleased to have found a new Kona cotton that is almost a perfect match to the original from 70+ (?) years ago.

Double Wedding Ring, Detail

Double Wedding Ring, Detail

Since it is so bright and cheery, this quilt has been a nice “summer” quilt for the house.

 

A non-quilting project

I could not resist this fabric at my local shop;  I really never know what will catch my eye, and this one turned out to be perfect for a shirt for my brother Dave.  There is a possibility he might actually wear it on occasion.

IMG_0742_2

 

 





Vintage Scrappy Triangles

20 06 2014

Blue Triangles is another from my vintage collection of quilt tops that have been made into wonderful quilts that we use.  As I have described before, I love to complete the work of someone who has come before me;  it feels right somehow.

The pattern is a Thousand Pyramids variation, set sideways.  Using a slightly different dark/light arrangement, it would be Streak o’ Lightning or Lightning.  Almost all of the lights in this quilt are vintage men’s shirtings.  And I am just guessing that at some point it needed to get just a little bit wider, and additional scraps were found.

Blue Triangles, date unknown

Blue Triangles, date unknown

 

I used this quilt top to help me learn to machine quilt, managing to quilt the whole thing without marking.

Blue Triangles, Detail

Blue Triangles, Detail

 

 

Back to the present—A Sneak Peek

Remember the wheels from the Wheel Medallion in the most recent post?

In addition to the many other preconceived notions I had regarding that quilt, I also thought it would have a snaky border of these fan sections, but that did not turn out to be the case.  Sooooo, I had 28 of these block parts leftover.  I LOVE leftovers, because they challenge me to solve the puzzle of dealing with them.

So here is a glimpse of how I am working on with them.

Seriously, people:  Never throw anything away!

fans_preview_2





Triple Irish Chain in Peach

11 04 2014

Another special piece from my vintage collection is this quilt done in the Triple Irish Chain pattern.   Masterfully pieced, this quilt has many extras that make it stand out from others of its kind.

The solid fabrics  in the centers of the pieced blocks add diagonal interest, as well as perfectly representing the reigning range of classic solid colors out of which many quilts were made in the 1930’s.

And all these colors, along with the patchwork piecing, pop right out of the pale peach background.

Peach Irish Chain, date unknown

Triple Irish Chain, date unknown

Helping with the diagonal focus are the solid bright yellow patches, strategically placed to run across the quilt, right through the middle of the solid blocks.

If my eyes put the bright yellow right next to the pale peach, I see a dissonance, so I am quite impressed that this quilter could see that the finished quilt would be quite powerful using these two fabrics.

Peach Irish Chain, detail

Triple Irish Chain, detail

These yellow blocks also form the center of the pieced borders, help to unify the piece, and create a fabulous spring/summer quilt.

Enjoy!

 





One more garden

8 11 2013

I recently fell into the abyss that is Pinterest.  I searched “hexagon quilt” and lost an hour looking at all the fabulous pictures of vintage as well as modern quilts using hexagons.  Very, very inspiring . . . almost as much fun as the paper pieced diamonds.

This fall inspired me to post another from my vintage collection, this variation on the traditional Grandmother’s Flower Garden quilt pattern.

I could not resist this top when I found it in Houston.  The quilter has done a great job of distributing the colors within the diamonds, and I love the bold use of the orange and royal blue hexagons for emphasis.  I’m even having trouble imagining this quilt without them.  (But I have no trouble seeing this with light blue in place of the pink.  Too boring???)

Flower Garden in Diamonds, date unknown 75" x 80"

Flower Garden in Diamonds, date unknown
75″ x 80″

This detail shows the wide variety of 30’s fabrics used, as well as the nice hand quilting by Quilting Plus.

Flower Garden in Diamonds, detail

Flower Garden in Diamonds, detail

I remembered hearing that the hexagons that separate the “flowers” or “diamonds” in a Grandmother’s Flower Garden were called stepping stones, but I cannot find that fact through quick research.  Perhaps the “stepping stone” label is used when these motifs are separated by diamonds instead of solid hexagons.  I’ll continue my research and update as necessary.

In the meantime, I’ll just enjoy using these fun quilts.





Feed Sack Log Cabin

18 10 2013

Made from another of the vintage tops I had collected, this quilt is made almost entirely of feed sack fabrics.  The red centers of the blocks give a big punch to this quilt.

Unfortunately I have no record of when I got this top;  it may be another from Eli Leon.  Regardless, I know I waited a long time before I had it quilted, and when it was finished by Nina Farrell, I saw how wonderful it really was.

Also quite wonky, this quilt’s appeal for me is not in the precision of the sewing, but in the fabric.  I know I’m nuts, but I love these old prints.

Feed Sack Log Cabin, date unknown

Feed Sack Log Cabin, date unknown

Here is a detail of the machine quilting done by Nina Farrell, who got one of these lovely flowers in each red center.

Feed Sack Log Cabin, detail 1

Feed Sack Log Cabin, detail 1

For the back of the quilt, I used feed sacks and feed sack scraps from my collection.  I tried to use the wildest prints I could find, so they could be showcased on this big back.  Click on the photos to enlarge, and also see the detail below of some of the prints–crazy, crazy stuff.

Feed Sack Log Cabin, back

Feed Sack Log Cabin, back

Feed Sack Log Cabin, detail 2

Feed Sack Log Cabin, detail 2

All photography by Sibila Savage unless otherwise noted.