Purple Geese

29 07 2016

I just finished five quilts in time to get them photographed, quite a flurry of activity.

It was fun finally to finish this Flying Geese quilt, and I say “finally” even though I have no idea when I even started it.

When a class project more than 15 years ago did not turn out as I would have liked, I used all the fabrics I had gathered for the class and all the left over cut pieces and started sewing these geese on freezer paper, three geese to a block.  I worked on these randomly, and then there was a huge pile of them, which became this quilt top.

After that,  the top sat unquilted for the longest time.  The 2016 New Year’s resolutions to finish my projects really worked in this case, and here is the quilt that grew from that abandoned project.

artwork by Susan Dague

Purple Geese, 2016

59″ x 63″   

The quilting is very simple.  I wanted the plaids to do all the heavy lifting.  I think they do a great job.

258_PurpleGeesemed_3

 

Purple Geese Detail

And I gratefully acknowledge Gerry Roy and Roberta Horton for helping to nurture a love of plaids early on in my quilting life.  These fun fabrics are a a joy to work with, and I try to include them in everything I do.

If I had known I would love this one as much as I do, I’d like to think I might have finished it sooner.  Oh, well . . .

AND

there’s one more, finished in 2009.  It’s probably the remains of the class project that did not please me and did not warrant finishing as a full-sized quilt.  Done. (Must have had strong New Year’s resolutions in 2009, too).

111_AllPlaids_medAll Plaids, 2009

42″ x 44″

 

 

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More Nancy Drew

25 03 2016

The full-sized version of the Nancy Drew quilt is finally finished and photographed.  There were so many of these great fabrics that I felt I had to include as much as I possibly could.  The bold colors were fun to play with.

Get a Clue with Nancy Drew, 2015 61" x 73"

Get a Clue with Nancy Drew, 2015                  61″ x 73″

And here is a detail of the blocks and some of the quilting.

253_NancyDrewDetailA_med_2

 

The “Get a Clue” line of fabrics from Moda also included these larger panels of the book covers, so I used this piece for the back instead of trying to find a comfortable way to cut these into blocks.

Nancy Drew Quilt--Back

Do you remember Nancy?  Yes, I read the books in my youth, and I have re-read a few more recently, too, just to take a trip down memory lane.

Now my daughter collects those old books we all discarded, so this quilt is for her.

 

Photography by Sibila Savage





Get a Clue with Nancy Drew

11 12 2015

Any Nancy Drew mysteries fans out there?  My sister, my cousins and I would gobble these books up when we were young.

Now my daughter collects all the ones we threw away, and also the ones that were published before even I was born!

So when Moda produced a line of Get a Clue with Nancy Drew fabric a few years ago, I was intrigued.  How could all these brights work together in a quilt.

This quilt is made from the leftovers from making Maggie’s quilt.  Yes, another where the leftovers were finished before the major quilt.

Nancy Drew II, 2015 44.5" x 44.5"

  Nancy Drew II, 2015
  44.5″ x 44.5″

 

Simple quilting in each of the blocks in the center part of the quilt.

Nancy Drew II, Detail 1

Nancy Drew II, Detail 1

. . .  and a red diamond quilting pattern in the border.   I’m getting good enough to be able to do this one without marking the lines.

Nancy Drew II, Detail 3

Nancy Drew II, Detail 3

I still have plenty of this fabric left, so I will make a few more small ones like this, and they all will be available in the Marketplace of the Voices in Cloth 2016 show in March of next year.  Click here for more details about that show.

 





One simple quilt

27 11 2015

But first—

Last week I forgot to include a picture of the back of the Indigo Study quilt (#250) in the post.  Although nothing like the Japanese style of the front of the quilt, the colors of this piece were so perfect and the fabric was so wonderful that I thought it would be fun as a back.

Indigo Study, Back

                                          Indigo Study, Back

And now a super simple quilt, just the thing for someone getting started, since four patches combined with whole square blocks are an easy pattern to sew in this straight grid.

This is also the perfect quilt to use up all those 2.5″ squares I keep cutting from leftover scraps of finished quilts.

In this case, however, the Leftover quilt was finished before the original one, perhaps because it was so much smaller and that much easier to quilt and bind.

Turquoise Four Patches, 2015 44.5" x 44.5"

                                 Turquoise Four Patches, 2015
                                                    44.5″ x 44.5″

Here are two detail photos showing the quilting pattern in the body of the quilt and in the borders.  This is an easy pattern for me to quilt using the walking foot and not marking before I start the curves, mainly because I have done soooo many quilts like this.  I like how it looks complicated but is quite simple, sewing each row of the curves twice, from top to bottom and side to side.

Turquoise Four Patches, 2015 44.5" x 44.5"

                               Turquoise Four Patches Detail 1

 

Turquoise Four Patches, Detail 2

                                      Turquoise Four Patches, Detail 2

This quilt will also be available for purchase at the Voices in Cloth 2016 quilt show this coming March.





Happy Quilt II-much more fun

14 08 2015

Surprise, surprise. . . . I just can’t stop playing with these bright, bold, geometric fabrics that I first began to put together when taking the Freddy Moran Parts Department class  (see previous post about the Happy Quilt).

 

So I made Happy Quilt II, because I still had more of these strata leftover (hooorrraaaaaay for leftovers!!).  And the yellow background fabric in this quilt in between the rows of strips reminds me of another quilt of mine, Yellow Rows of Seven.

When I started quilting a thousand years ago, people did not favor yellow and orange, thinking they were too bold and difficult to work in with other colors.  So it feels as though I have come full circle now, loving yellow and orange equally with all the other colors.

Happy Quilt II, 2015 60" x 74" Photography by Sibila Savage

Happy Quilt II, 2015
60″ x 74″
Photography by Sibila Savage

And I had fun doing a very simple quilting pattern on this quilt.  Seems as though “simple” is my only style these days.

Happy Quilt II, detail

Happy Quilt II, detail

And stay tuned.  I am pretty sure that I am not finished with this “Happy” phase.  Guess it’s a series.

Here’s an option for another, although I’m not completely satisfied with it yet.  Must by why it’s not finished yet.

Happy work in progress

Happy work in progress





Work-in-progress; more leftover tales

20 02 2015

Do you have days when you want to sit at your machine and just sew and sew and sew?

At a recent retreat, I made tons of new “parts” for a fun and happy quilt, and these long strings of strata or piano keys leftover from my previous Freddy-Moran-ish venture looked as though they would not work in the new quilt, since they did not seems to play together well with the new creations.

I decided that I did not want to work right now on quilts that take a lot of brain power.  I have done enough of that recently, and I am meeting personal challenges right now, so my work does not need to be challenging, too.  It needs to be safe, fun, and easy right now.

Sooooo, rather than trying to find a way to make them fit, I decided to let them play all by themselves.  Here is where I am so far in this fun new project.  I’m fascinated at how much this modern version reminds me of my Yellow Rows of Seven, which is all vintage fabrics.

Have I started a series?

IMG_0120

The only problem (so far):  there are now leftover leftovers, the strata that don’t fit into this new quilt, which would be huge if they did.  Wow, I guess I really did make too many of these.  Just couldn’t stop, since they were soooooo fun to sew.  These are the remaining strips . . . .

IMG_0119

. . . and these are the remaining waiting-to-be-strata pieces.

IMG_0121Beginning to think this quilt may have some sort of a strata border??

To be continued . . .





Vintage Drunkard’s Path, a variation

13 02 2015

I fell in love with this quilt top when I found it in 1994 in an antique collective in Rockford, Illinois.  According to Barbara Brackman, this block is a Rob Peter to Pay Paul variation of the familiar Drunkard’s Path block.

#8C_RobPeterToPayPaul

All the very bright colors make this a very happy quilt, and it is one that we use.

RobPeterDetail1

I replaced five heavily stained blocks with ones made from vintage fabric in my stash.  Two of the blocks I replaced are pictured here, second and third down.

RobPeterDetail2

This 1994 quilt also represents the beginning of my long and still-continuing process of learning machine quilting.  I see here that all I was able to do at the time was outline each of these blocks in the ditch.  Gotta start somewhere.